Say NO to Fire Ants

fire antsSpring can bring on beauty and amazing growth, but it’s also the time for fire ants. These little guys love to take up camp in your flower beds, and it ain’t pretty. Be sure to treat fire ant beds so they will not return.

The most sure fire (no pun intended) way to get rid of fire ant beds is to use insecticides such as Ortho Fire Ant Killer or granular mound treatments. You can find these at Bar None.

If you’re using Ortho, here are a few tips on usage:

  • Sprinkle 1 tablespoon dry powder over each mound
  • DO NOT WATER IN
  • Try not to disturb mounds while treating.
  • For best results, apply when fire ants are active
  • Do not apply during heavy dew or just before a rain

What is a Mound Treatment?

Mound treatments are dry or liquid drench treatments containing fast-acting contact insecticides that you apply directly to individual fire ant mounds.They kill quickly and are the fastest way to eliminate big, troublesome mounds that are just ‘in the wrong place’. Mound treatments are also a convenient way to deal with mounds that ‘pop up’ between bait treatments.

If you’re looking for more natural ways to get rid of fire ants, you can also do a few of these home remedy tricks:

Hot water
Pouring hot water on the mounds is effective and environmentally friendly, but may require 3 or 4 applications to kill the colony. Water should be at least scalding hot, but does not need to be boiling. This works best when you use 3 to 4 gallons of water in each application. WARNING:Hot water kills grass and shrubbery and may cause severe burns if spilled.

Diatomaceous earth
Little crystals of silica are supposed to scratch the ant’s cuticle so they dehydrate and die. Indeed, if you take a colony of ants and shake them up in bag with diatomaceous earth, about half die. But when you use it on ants outside they usually find ways to avoid it so not many ants are killed. They will not eat it in food and foraging ants do not track it into colonies where it might kill the queen or young fire ants.

Mixing different colonies together
The idea is that workers from the two colonies fight until they kill each other. Workers from two single-queen colonies will fight if they are mixed, but it will rarely result in both or even one colony being killed. However, if you mix fire ant colonies together with multiple-queens in them, it only makes for a bigger party.

Whatever you choose to do, come into Bar None for tips and ideas. We will also point you to the most effective ant treatments, whether the problem is inside your home our in your yard.

 

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